Better wages for a better budget

As an economic-growth and budget-balancing tool, helping working people and their families with a wage increase deserves consideration

More and more Pennsylvanians are realizing the benefits to workers, businesses and the PA budget of a wage increase for workers.

 

A Pittsburgh City Council member will introduce a resolution this week urging the legislature to pass House Democratic legislation to raise the minimum wage in Pennsylvania to $15 per hour by 2024.

 

The bill, like other proposals by House Democrats to help you and your family in recent years, has been stuck in a Republican-led committee since its introduction.

 

Pennsylvania is surrounded by neighboring states that have all raised wages for workers.

 

 

We have parents in Pennsylvania working full-time jobs who cannot afford housing, who cannot afford child care, and who struggle to put food on the table.

 

Our state and our workers and their families are falling behind without a living wage.

 

Our insufficient minimum wage is hurting our state and local budgets, too, as our economy and revenue collections suffer.

 

An increase in the minimum wage would directly and indirectly boost the earnings of more than 1.2 million Pennsylvanians -- nearly one out of every four working people.

 

Total wages in Pennsylvania would increase by $2 billion and new spending by working people and their families would create 6,000 jobs.

 

Higher earnings for workers means more revenues for the state -- without the need for a tax increase.

 

And, it means less money spent in the state and communities for assistance programs. 

 

These benefits are already showing up in other states where worker wages are rising.

 

Pennsylvania is falling behind as wages for our working people stagnate and our budget deficit grows.

 

As an economic-growth and budget-balancing tool, helping working people and their families with a wage increase deserves consideration.